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Exhibits
 
Museum Exhibits The Museum is located at 1333 Butte House Road, Yuba City. Hours are Wednesday through Friday 9-5, and Saturday 12-4. The Museum has a number of permanent exhibits on the Maidu Indians, early Sutter County settlers, agriculture, the Sutter Buttes, and school life. Some special items of interest are the restored Yuba Ball Tractor, John Sutter's Gun, and Lola Montez's dressing table.

The Exhibits combine artifacts, photographs and interpretive labels that provide a self-guided tour. Group tours are available Wednesday through Friday by appointment only.

Special Exhibits in the Main Hall change every three to four months. They include in-house exhibits with a local focus as well as traveling exhibits with a broader context focusing on California and Western history.

Becoming American - Permanent Exhibit
 
Becoming American

In 2007, the Community Memorial Museum of Sutter County began work on its long-awaited new Multi-Cultural Wing to tell the history and stories of our area’s diverse peoples. In 2011, the first permanent exhibit to be completed was that of the Japanese-American community, as a result of collaboration with the Japanese American Citizens League. March 2012 marked the opening of the Punjabi and South Asian American exhibit, with the Museum working closely with the Punjabi-American Heritage Society. We look forward to the completion of the Chinese-American exhibit also in 2012. The Museum is working together with the Alliance for Hispanic Advancement to create an exhibit to tell the stories of our Hispanic community. The history of several other ethnic groups will ultimately be included in the Multi-Cultural wing.

The “Becoming American” museum project was conceived by a group of individuals interested in documenting and preserving the migration history of Punjabis and Southeast Asians to the United States, the Yuba-Sutter area in particular. The history of the pioneers is one of trials and tribulations and a commitment to success in a land so foreign from the one they left behind. Punjabi / South Asian pioneers left India in pursuit of a better life for themselves and their families. Some came by ship while others came by air...most not having a clue as to what lay ahead. They faced many difficulties due to language and cultural differences and encountered rampant discrimination. Their story is one of determination and survival. So compelling is their history that we found it necessary to showcase these stories so that they would not be lost forever.

It is our hope that the museum exhibit as well as the book, “Becoming American”, will bring their stories to life in a way that they will be remembered for generations to come. Their lives may seem ordinary to folks today, but they have left a legacy that is nothing short of extra-ordinary. They paved the way for future generations to achieve the “American Dream”. It is with honor we recognize and celebrate their achievements through the “Becoming American” museum project and book.

 Mexican-American Exhibit
 

We've finally completed our Mexican-American exhibit, which means our Multi-Cultural wing is complete!

 
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Mexican-American Exhibit
Mexican-American Exhibit
Mexican-American Exhibit
Mexican-American Exhibit
 Art of Survival
 

Art of Survival is a traveling exhibition probing the complexity of the Japanese American confinement site in Newell, CA. It became the only officially designated segregation center during WWII and was ruled under martial law. Called Tule Lake, this location was the largest of the 10 confinement sites and, because anyone deemed a troublemaker by the federal government was relocated to Tule Lake, it ultimately housed people from all sites. Many of the people who were brought in under segregation were people who knew their rights had been egregiously undermined and were willing to stand up to the injustice. Accused of being disloyal, in their dissent, they were ironically acting in the most American way. The incarceration of 120,000 people of Japanese descent, most citizens of this nation, was a travesty; Tule Lake was exponentially disturbing.

Through haunting images of artifacts by fine art photographer Hiroshi Watanabe we glimpse into the lives of those who were held at Tule Lake and are encouraged to consider both the orchestration of life behind barbed wire and what it might have been like to live with constant turmoil and uncertainty. Oral histories allow us to hear varying views on some of the complex issues of Tule Lake in the voices of those held captive.

 
Click on an image below to view enlarged version
Art of Survival
Art of Survival
Art of Survival
Art of Survival

Art of Survival is being supported in part by a Preservation of Japanese American Confinement Sites Grant administered by the National Park Service, Department of the Interior. Further support provided by The Oregon Community Foundation, Fred W. Fields Fund; Klamath Tourism Grant; Klamath Arts Council Grant; and generous donations by Densho Digital Archives and Hiroshi Watanabe. This traveling exhibition was made in cooperation with The Tule Lake Unit of WWII Valor in the Pacific National Monument, Beds National Monument, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Virtual Exhibit
 

Our Virtual Exhibit web site will take you on a virtual tour through historic photographs of Sutter County and Marysville.



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